The Heart Of Royal Marriage

Chaumet has embodied Parisian elegance and excellence since its foundation in 1780. Over the centuries, its most exceptional masterpieces have often been transformed into decorative arts, and subsequently the Maison has become known as an industry pioneer for creativity.

Imperial Splendours: The Art of Jewellery Since the 18th Century commemorates this longstanding influence. Hosted at The Palace Museum, Beijing (formerly The Forbidden City), the Maison’s jewellery is being showcased in an exceptional location like no other. As part of the exciting cultural exchange, the exhibit’s chosen pieces have witnessed many of the most incredible royal coronations in European history.

Here’s MOJEH.com’s edit of the elegant diadems that are currently on display and, by doing so, we examine the spectacular beauty of these artworks, as well as Chaumet’s incredible spirit of craftsmanship.

Ears of wheat bending in the wind diadem, 1811 | François-Regnault Nitot took over his father’s jewellery house on his death in 1809 and continued the business until the fall of the Napoleonic Empire in 1815. This magnificent and majestic creation utilises the ear of the wheat motif, which became a favourite of the Empress Joséphine and a symbol of fertility. Made for Empress Marie-Louise, in its day this was a superbly modern and unusual jewellery piece.

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Ears of wheat bending in the wind diadem, 1811 | François-Regnault Nitot took over his father’s jewellery house on his death in 1809 and continued the business until the fall of the Napoleonic Empire in 1815. This magnificent and majestic creation utilises the ear of the wheat motif, which became a favourite of the Empress Joséphine and a symbol of fertility. Made for Empress Marie-Louise, in its day this was a superbly modern and unusual jewellery piece.

Diadem with briar roses and jasmine flowers, 1830 | This extremely traditional tiara was acquired by Francis Russell, 7th Duke of Bedford, for his wife Anna-Maria. Flowers, fruits, briar roses and jasmine leaves all feature and appear in multiple pieces crafted by its creator, Jean-Baptiste Fossin. A timelessly elegant masterpiece, each bold flower is completed with a jaw-dropping showcase diamond.

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Diadem with briar roses and jasmine flowers, 1830 | This extremely traditional tiara was acquired by Francis Russell, 7th Duke of Bedford, for his wife Anna-Maria. Flowers, fruits, briar roses and jasmine leaves all feature and appear in multiple pieces crafted by its creator, Jean-Baptiste Fossin. A timelessly elegant masterpiece, each bold flower is completed with a jaw-dropping showcase diamond.

Radiant sun aigrette, 1914 | Celestial motifs first became intensely popular in the early 20th Century as an alternative to the late 19th Century stars and crescent moons. They were also amongst Joseph Chaumet’s favourite themes of inspiration. Gold and platinum is used to showcase a phenomenal emerald, that’s surrounded by glittering diamonds. Truly ethereal, this piece is certainly a head turner.

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Radiant sun aigrette, 1914 | Celestial motifs first became intensely popular in the early 20th Century as an alternative to the late 19th Century stars and crescent moons. They were also amongst Joseph Chaumet’s favourite themes of inspiration. Gold and platinum is used to showcase a phenomenal emerald, that’s surrounded by glittering diamonds. Truly ethereal, this piece is certainly a head turner.

Diadem with fuchsia motifs, known as Bourbon-Parme, 1919 | Sparkling platinum is set with regal diamonds, a fine example of the illustrious Maison’s trompe-l’oeil (optical illusion) effect. Chaumet painstakingly created this surprisingly contemporary crown to mark the wedding of Hedwige de La Rochefoucauld to Prince Sixte de Bourbon-Parme, brother of the Empress Zita of Austria. Mottled with fuchsia flower motifs, it’s a fabulous example of the brand’s skill and ability.

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Diadem with fuchsia motifs, known as Bourbon-Parme, 1919 | Sparkling platinum is set with regal diamonds, a fine example of the illustrious Maison’s trompe-l’oeil (optical illusion) effect. Chaumet painstakingly created this surprisingly contemporary crown to mark the wedding of Hedwige de La Rochefoucauld to Prince Sixte de Bourbon-Parme, brother of the Empress Zita of Austria. Mottled with fuchsia flower motifs, it’s a fabulous example of the brand’s skill and ability.

Diadem from the Bourbon-Parme parure, 1936 | Supremely feminine, blood-red rubies decorate this collerette-styled diadem. Each stone was taken from the inheritance of the then Emperor of Austria, Franz-Josef. The Maison designed the tiara in celebration of the wedding between Alice de Bourbon-Parme and the Infant of Spain, Prince Alphonse de Bourbon-Sicile. Extremely versatile, this piece can be easily transformed and worn as a statement necklace.

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Diadem from the Bourbon-Parme parure, 1936 | Supremely feminine, blood-red rubies decorate this collerette-styled diadem. Each stone was taken from the inheritance of the then Emperor of Austria, Franz-Josef. The Maison designed the tiara in celebration of the wedding between Alice de Bourbon-Parme and the Infant of Spain, Prince Alphonse de Bourbon-Sicile. Extremely versatile, this piece can be easily transformed and worn as a statement necklace.

Vertiges diadem, 2017 | Heavily inspired by the Maison’s tradition of naturalism, Scott Armstrong has evoked the chaotic yet tranquil aesthetic of a contemporary garden. White and red gold is set with spectacular baguette, square and brilliant-cut diamonds, as well as bursts of moss green tourmalines and garnets. Curved lines are combined with poker-straight rods, which disrupt the classic symmetry of the piece's structure.

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Vertiges diadem, 2017 | Heavily inspired by the Maison’s tradition of naturalism, Scott Armstrong has evoked the chaotic yet tranquil aesthetic of a contemporary garden. White and red gold is set with spectacular baguette, square and brilliant-cut diamonds, as well as bursts of moss green tourmalines and garnets. Curved lines are combined with poker-straight rods, which disrupt the classic symmetry of the piece's structure.