Art In Dubai: July

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Dubai is fast becoming an international art destination with an impressive plethora of art festivals and exhibitions showcasing the best in painting, sculpture and performance art on a regular basis. Here are MOJEH’s recommended art exhibitions that shouldn’t be missed in the melting pot this month.

 

Modernist Women of Egypt

Date: Until July 27th

Location: Green Art Gallery, Alserkal Avenue

Time: Saturday to Thursday, 10am to 7pm

An exceptional collection of beautiful Egyptian modern artworks is currently on display at the Green Art Gallery, exploring surprisingly modern themes from activism to globalisation. Visitors explore Egyptian life between the Fifties and Seventies, mostly through the eyes of bold female artists, during what has since become known as the region’s “golden period” of the 20th Century.

Almost Home

Date: Until July 25th

Location: The Third Line, Alserkal Avenue 

Time: Saturday to Thursday, 10am to 7pm

Amir H. Fallah is unfortunately all too aware of the challenges surrounding immigration, being an Iranian-American immigrant himself. His latest body of exceptional artwork explores the realities associated with relocating to another country under duress, thus drawing on his own life experiences and homeland’s history. In-depth and thought provoking, this truly spectacular showcase seamlessly connects the past with the present, leaving plenty of lessons to be learned.

Hurban Vortex

Date: Until September 15th

Location: La Galerie, Alliance Française Dubai, Oud Metha

Time: Saturday to Wednesday, 9am to 6pm; Thursday, 9am – 1pm; Saturday, 10am – 4pm

French photographer Boris Wilensky’s latest photography exhibition contrasts two versions of Japan, both of which he has had the opportunity to witness firsthand. Although currently one of the most boundary-breaking countries in the world, mottled with neon lights and Space Age-inspired architecture, 2017’s Japan is juxtaposed with the Fukushima nuclear disaster of 2011.

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